Avastin 25mg/ml concentrate for solution for infusion

  • Name:

    Avastin 25mg/ml concentrate for solution for infusion

  • Company:
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  • Active Ingredients:

    Bevacizumab

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    Product subject to medical prescription which may not be renewed (A)

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Roche Registration GmbH

Company Products

Medicine NameActive Ingredients
Medicine Name Alecensa 150 mg Hard Capsules Active Ingredients Alectinib hydrochloride
Medicine Name Avastin 25mg/ml concentrate for solution for infusion Active Ingredients Bevacizumab
Medicine Name CellCept 1g/5ml Powder for Oral Suspension Active Ingredients Mycophenolate Mofetil
Medicine Name CellCept 250mg Capsules Active Ingredients Mycophenolate Mofetil
Medicine Name CellCept 500mg Film-coated Tablets Active Ingredients Mycophenolate Mofetil
Medicine Name CellCept 500mg powder for concentrate for solution for infusion Active Ingredients Mycophenolate mofetil hydrochloride
Medicine Name Cotellic 20 mg film-coated tablets Active Ingredients Cobimetinib hemifumarate
Medicine Name Erivedge 150 mg Hard Capsules Active Ingredients Vismodegib
Medicine Name Esbriet 267 mg Hard Capsules Active Ingredients Pirfenidone
Medicine Name Esbriet 267 mg, 534 mg and 801 mg Film-coated Tablets Active Ingredients Pirfenidone
Medicine Name Gazyvaro 1,000 mg concentrate for solution for infusion Active Ingredients Obinutuzumab
Medicine Name Hemlibra 150 mg/mL Solution for Injection Active Ingredients Emicizumab
Medicine Name Hemlibra 30 mg/mL Solution for Injection Active Ingredients Emicizumab
Medicine Name Herceptin 150mg Powder for concentrate for solution for infusion Active Ingredients Trastuzumab
Medicine Name Herceptin 600 mg Solution for Injection in Vial Active Ingredients Trastuzumab
Medicine Name Kadcyla 100mg & 160mg powder for concentrate for solution for infusion Active Ingredients Trastuzumab emtansine
Medicine Name MabThera 100 mg and 500 mg concentrate for solution for infusion Active Ingredients Rituximab
Medicine Name MabThera 1400 mg Solution for Subcutaneous Injection Active Ingredients Rituximab
Medicine Name NeoRecormon solution for injection Pre-Filled Syringe Active Ingredients Epoetin beta
Medicine Name OCREVUS 300 mg concentrate for solution for infusion Active Ingredients Ocrelizumab
Medicine Name Pegasys 90, 135 and 180 micrograms solution for injection in pre-filled syringe Active Ingredients Peginterferon alfa-2a
Medicine Name Perjeta 420 mg Concentrate for Solution for Infusion Active Ingredients Pertuzumab
Medicine Name Polivy 140 mg powder for concentrate for solution for infusion Active Ingredients Polatuzumab Vedotin
Medicine Name RoActemra 162 mg solution for injection in pre-filled pen Active Ingredients tocilizumab
Medicine Name RoActemra 162 mg solution for injection in pre-filled syringe Active Ingredients tocilizumab
1 - 0 of 36 items.Total: Infinity pages

When a pharmaceutical company changes any document, a new version is published on medicines.ie. For each version, we show the dates it was published on medicines.ie and the reasons for change.

Updated on 4 March 2020 SmPC

Reasons for updating

  • Change to section 4.2 - Posology and method of administration
  • Change to section 6.3 - Shelf life
  • Correction of spelling/typing errors

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EMEA/H/C/000582/IB/112

Shelf life extension: 48hours to 30 days for in-use stability

Updated on 4 March 2020 PIL

Reasons for updating

  • Change to section 5 - how to store or dispose
  • Correction of spelling/typing errors

Updated on 4 March 2020 PIL

Reasons for updating

  • Change to section 2 - what you need to know - warnings and precautions

Updated on 2 October 2019 SmPC

Reasons for updating

  • Change to section 4.4 - Special warnings and precautions for use
  • Change to section 4.8 - Undesirable effects

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Sections 4.4 and 4.8 to be updated to include aneurysms and artery dissections as per PRAC recommendation from 11th July 2019 (EMA/PRAC/347724/2019).

Updated on 2 October 2019 PIL

Reasons for updating

  • Change to section 2 - what you need to know - warnings and precautions

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EMA/PRAC/347724/2019

Updated on 28 May 2019 SmPC

Reasons for updating

  • Change to section 5.1 - Pharmacodynamic properties
  • Change to section 10 - Date of revision of the text

Legal category: Product subject to medical prescription which may not be renewed (A)

Updated on 14 August 2018 PIL

Reasons for updating

  • Change to section 6 - date of revision
  • Change to other sources of information section

Updated on 23 March 2018 SmPC

Reasons for updating

  • New SmPC for new product

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Updated on 23 March 2018 SmPC

Reasons for updating

  • Change to section 7 - Marketing authorisation holder
  • Change to section 10 - Date of revision of the text

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7.         MARKETING AUTHORISATION HOLDER

 

Roche Registration GmbH

Emil-Barell-Strasse 1

79639 Grenzach-Wyhlen

Germany

Roche Registration Limited

6 Falcon Way

Shire Park

Welwyn Garden City

AL7 1TW

United Kingdom

 

10.       DATE OF REVISION OF THE TEXT

 

16 March 2018

Updated on 22 March 2018 PIL

Reasons for updating

  • New PIL for new product

Updated on 22 March 2018 PIL

Reasons for updating

  • Change to section 6 - marketing authorisation holder
  • Change to section 6 - date of revision

Updated on 13 June 2017 SmPC

Reasons for updating

  • Change to section 4.1 - Therapeutic indications
  • Change to section 4.2 - Posology and method of administration
  • Change to section 4.8 - Undesirable effects
  • Change to section 5.1 - Pharmacodynamic properties
  • Change to section 10 - Date of revision of the text

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4.1          Therapeutic indications

[…]

Bevacizumab, in combination with carboplatin and paclitaxel is indicated for the front-line treatment of adult patients with advanced (International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stages III B, III C and IV) epithelial ovarian, fallopian tube, or primary peritoneal cancer. (See section 5.1).

Bevacizumab, in combination with carboplatin and gemcitabine or in combination with carboplatin and paclitaxel, is indicated for treatment of adult patients with first recurrence of platinum-sensitive epithelial ovarian, fallopian tube or primary peritoneal cancer who have not received prior therapy with bevacizumab or other VEGF inhibitors or VEGF receptor–targeted agents.

[…]

4.2          Posology and method of administration

[…]

Treatment of platinum-sensitive recurrent disease: Avastin is administered in combination with either carboplatin and gemcitabine for 6 cycles and up to 10 cycles or in combination with carboplatin and paclitaxel for 6 cycles and up to 8 cycles, followed by continued use of Avastin as single agent until disease progression.The recommended dose of Avastin is 15 mg/kg of body weight given once every 3 weeks as an intravenous infusion.

[…]

4.8          Undesirable effects

Summary of the safety profile

The overall safety profile of Avastin is based on data from over 5,7400 patients with various malignancies, predominantly treated with Avastin in combination with chemotherapy in clinical trials.

[…]

Table 1: Adverse Reactions by Frequency

System organ class

Very Common

Common

Uncommon

Rare

Very Rare

Frequency Not Known

Metabolism and nutrition disorders

Anorexia

Hypomagnesaemia

Hyponatraemia

 

Dehydration

 

 

 

 

Respiratory, thoracic and mediastinal disorders

Dyspnoea,

Rhinitis

Epistaxis

Cough

Pulmonary

haemorrhage/

Haemoptysisb,d,

Pulmonary

embolism,

Epistaxis,

Hypoxia,

Dysphoniaa

 

 

 

Pulmonary

hypertensiona,

Nasal septum

perforationa

Musculoskeletal  and connective tissue disorders

Arthralgia

Myalgia

 

Fistulab,d,

Myalgia,

Muscular weakness,

Back pain

 

 

 

Osteonecrosis of the jawa,b

Non-mandibular osteonecrosisa,f

 

[…]

Table 2: Severe Adverse Reactions by Frequency

System organ class

Very Common

Common

Uncommon

Rare

Very Rare

Frequency Not Known

Metabolism and nutrition disorders

 

Dehydration

Hyponatraemia

 

 

 

 

 

[…]

Description of selected serious adverse reactions

 

Gastrointestinal (GI) perforations and Fistulae (see section 4.4)

Avastin has been associated with serious cases of gastrointestinal perforation.

Gastrointestinal perforations have been reported in clinical trials with an incidence of less than 1% in patients with non-squamous non-small cell lung cancer, up to 1.3% in patients with metastatic breast cancer, up to 2.0% in patients with metastatic renal cell cancer or in patients with ovarian cancer receiving front-line treatment, and up to 2.7% (including gastrointestinal fistula and abscess) in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. From a clinical trial in patients with persistent, recurrent, or metastatic cervical cancer (study GOG-0240), GI perforations (all grade) were reported in 3.2% of patients, all of whom had a history of prior pelvic radiation.

[…]

GI-vaginal Fistulae in study GOG-0240

In a trial of patients with persistent, recurrent or metastatic cervical cancer, the incidence of GI-vaginal fistulae was 8.3% in Avastin‑treated patients and 0.9% in control patients, all of whom had a history of prior pelvic radiation. The frequency of GI-vaginal fistulae in the group treated with Avastin + chemotherapy was higher in patients with recurrence within the field of prior radiation (16.7%) compared with patients with no prior radiation and/ or no recurrence inside the field of prior radiation (3.6%). with recurrence outside the field of prior radiation (3.6%). The corresponding frequencies in the control group receiving chemotherapy alone were 1.1% vs. 0.8%, respectively. Patients who develop GI-vaginal fistulae may also have bowel obstructions and require surgical intervention as well as diverting ostomies.

[…]

In clinical trials of ovarian cancer, Grade 3-5 wound healing complications were observed in up to 1.82% of patients in the bevacizumab arm versus 0.1% in the control arm (NCI-CTCAE v.3).

[…]

Proteinuria ranged in severity from clinically asymptomatic, transient, trace proteinuria to nephrotic syndrome, with the great majority as Grade 1 proteinuria (NCI-CTCAE v.3). Grade 3 proteinuria was reported in up to 8.110.9% of treated patients. Grade 4 proteinuria (nephrotic syndrome) was seen in up to 1.4% of treated patients. Testing for proteinuria is recommended prior to start of Avastin therapy. In most clinical trials urine protein levels of ³ 2g/24 hrs led to the holding of Avastin until recovery to < 2g/24 hrs.

[…]

5.1          Pharmacodynamic properties

[…]

GOG-0218

The GOG-0218 study was a phase III multicentre, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, three arm study evaluating the effect of adding Avastin to an approved chemotherapy regimen (carboplatin and paclitaxel) in patients with advanced (FIGO Sstages IIIB, IIIC and IV according to FIGO staging version dated 1988) epithelial ovarian, fallopian tube or primary peritoneal cancer.

[…]

BO17707 (ICON7)

BO17707 was a Phase III, two arm, multicentre, randomised, controlled, open-label study comparing the effect of adding Avastin to carboplatin plus paclitaxel in patients with FIGO stage I or IIA (Grade 3 or clear cell histology only; n = 142), or FIGO stage IIB - IV (all Grades and all histological types, n = 1386) epithelial ovarian, fallopian tube or primary peritoneal cancer following surgery (NCI-CTCAE v.3). FIGO staging version dated 1988 was used in this trial.

[…]

Recurrent ovarian cancer

The safety and efficacy of Avastin in the treatment of recurrent epithelial ovarian, fallopian tube or primary peritoneal cancer was studied in threetwo phase III trials (AVF4095g ,and MO22224 and GOG-0213) with different patient populations and chemotherapy regimens.

          AVF4095g evaluated the efficacy and safety of bevacizumab in combination with carboplatin and gemcitabine, followed by bevacizumab as a single agent in patients with platinum-sensitive recurrent epithelial ovarian, fallopian tube or primary peritoneal cancer.

          GOG-0213 evaluated the efficacy and safety of bevacizumab in combination with carboplatin and paclitaxel, followed by bevacizumab as a single agent in patients with platinum-sensitive recurrent epithelial ovarian, fallopian tube or primary peritoneal cancer.

          MO22224 evaluated the efficacy and safety of bevacizumab in combination with paclitaxel, topotecan, or pegylated liposomal doxorubicin in patients with platinum-resistant recurrent epithelial ovarian, fallopian tube or primary peritoneal cancer.

[…]

GOG-0213

GOG-0213, a phase III randomized controlled open label trial, studied the safety and efficacy of Avastin in the treatment of patients with platinum-sensitive, recurrent epithelial ovarian, fallopian tube or primary peritoneal cancer, who have not received prior chemotherapy in the recurrent setting. There was no exclusion criterion for prior anti-angiogenic therapy. The study evaluated the effect of adding Avastin to carboplatin+paclitaxel and continuing Avastin as a single agent until disease progression or unacceptable toxicity compared to carboplatin+paclitaxel alone.

 

A total of 673 patients were randomized in equal proportions to the following two treatment arms:

     CP arm: Carboplatin (AUC5) and paclitaxel (175 mg/m2 IV) every 3 weeks for 6 and up to 8 cycles.

     CPB arm: Carboplatin (AUC5) and paclitaxel (175 mg/m2 IV) and concurrent Avastin (15 mg/kg) every 3 weeks for 6 and up to 8 cycles, followed by Avastin (15 mg/kg every 3 weeks) alone until disease progression or unacceptable toxicity.

Most patients in both the CP arm (80.4%) and the CPB arm (78.9%) were White. The median age was 60.0 years in the CP arm and 59.0 years in the CPB arm. The majority of patients (CP: 64.6%; CPB: 68.8%) were in the age category < 65 years. At baseline, most patients in both treatment arms had a GOG PS of 0 (CP: 82.4%: CPB; 80.7%) or 1 (CP: 16.7%: CPB; 18.1%). A GOG PS of 2 at baseline was reported in 0.9% of patients in the CP arm and in 1.2% of patients in the CPB arm.“

The primary efficacy endpoint was overall survival (OS). The main secondary efficacy endpoint was progression-free survival (PFS).Results are presented in Table 22.

 

Table 22               Efficacy results1,2 from study GOG-0213

Primary Endpoint

Overall Survival (OS)

CP

(n=336)

CPB

(n=337)

Median OS (months)

37.3

42.6

Hazard ratio (95% CI) (eCRF)a

0.823 [CI: 0.680, 0.996]

p-Value

0.0447

Hazard ratio (95% CI) (registration form)b

0.838 [CI: 0.693, 1.014]

p-Value

0.0683

Secondary Endpoints

Progression-free survival (PFS)

CP

(n=336)

CPB

(n=337)

Median PFS (months)

10.2

13.8

Hazard ratio (95% CI)

0.613 [CI: 0.521, 0.721]

p-value

<0.0001

1 Final Analysis 2 Tumour assessments and response evaluations were determined by the investigators using the GOG RECIST criteria (Revised RECIST guideline (version 1.1). Eur J Cancer. 2009;45:228Y247).

 

a Hazard ratio was estimated from Cox proportional hazards models stratified by the duration of platinum free-interval prior to enrolling onto this study per eCRF (electronic case report form) and secondary surgical debulking status Yes/No (Yes=randomized to undergo cytoreduction or randomized to not undergo cytoreduction; No= not a candidate or did not consent to cytoreduction). b stratified by the duration of treatment free-interval prior to enrolling onto this study per the registration form, and secondary surgical debulking status Yes/No.

 

The trial met its primary objective of OS improvement. Treatment with Avastin at 15 mg/kg every 3 weeks in combination with chemotherapy (carboplatin and paclitaxel) for 6 and up to 8 cycles, followed by Avastin until disease progression or unacceptable toxicity resulted, when data were derived from eCRF, in a clinically meaningful and statistically significant improvement in OS compared to treatment with carboplatin and paclitaxel alone.

[…]

10.          DATE OF REVISION OF THE TEXT

02 June 2017

Updated on 8 June 2017 PIL

Reasons for updating

  • Change to section 1 - what the product is used for
  • Change to section 4 - possible side effects
  • Change to section 6 - date of revision

Updated on 27 February 2017 SmPC

Reasons for updating

  • Change to section 4.2 - Posology and method of administration
  • Change to section 4.8 - Undesirable effects
  • Change to section 5.1 - Pharmacodynamic properties
  • Change to section 5.2 - Pharmacokinetic properties
  • Change to section 10 - Date of revision of the text

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4.2          Posology and method of administration

[…]

Paediatric population

 

The safety and efficacy of bevacizumab in children less than 18 years old have not been established. Avastin is not approved for use in patients under the age of 18 years. Currently available data are described in sections 4.8, 5.1 and 5.2 butThere is no relevant use of bevacizumab in the paediatric population and no recommendation on a posology can be made. Currently available data are described in sections 4.8, 5.1, 5.2 and 5.3.

 

There is no relevant use of bevacizumab in the paediatric population in the indications for treatment of cancers of the colon, rectum, breast, lung, ovarian, fallopian tube, peritoneum, cervix and kidney.

[…]

 

4.8          Undesirable effects

[…]

Paediatric population

The safety and efficacy of Avastin in children less than 18 years old  have not been established.

 

In study BO25041 of Avastin added to postoperative radiation therapy (RT) with concomitant and adjuvant temozolomide in paediatric patients with newly diagnosed supratentorial, infratentorial, cerebellar, or peduncular high-grade glioma, the safety profile was comparable with that observed in other tumour types in adults treated with Avastin. 

 

In study BO20924 of Avastin with current standard of care in rhabdomyosarcoma and non-rhabdomyosarcoma soft tissue sarcoma, the safety profile of Avastin treated children was comparable with that observed in adults treated with Avastin.

 

Avastin is not approved for use in patients under the age of 18 years. In published literature reports, cases of non-mandibular osteonecrosis have been observed in patients under the age of 18 years treated with Avastin (please see section 5.3).

[…]

 

5.1          Pharmacodynamic properties

[…]

High-grade glioma

Anti-tumour activity was not observed in two earlier studies among a total of 30 children aged > 3 years old with relapsed or progressive high-grade glioma when treated with bevacizumab and irinotecan (CPT-11). There is insufficient information to determine the safety and efficacy of bevacizumab in children with newly-diagnosed high-grade glioma.

 

·              In a single-arm study (PBTC-022), 18 children with recurrent or progressive non-pontine high-grade glioma (including 8 with glioblastoma [WHO Grade IV], 9 with anaplastic astrocytoma [Grade III] and 1 with anaplastic oligodendroglioma [Grade III]) were treated with bevacizumab (10 mg/kg) two weeks apart and then with bevacizumab in combination with CPT-11 (125-350 mg/m²) once every two weeks until progression. There were no objective (partial or complete) radiological responses (MacDonald criteria). Toxicity and adverse reactions included arterial hypertension and fatigue as well as CNS ischaemia with acute neurological deficit. 

 

·      In a retrospective single institution series, 12 consecutive (2005 to 2008) children with relapsed or progressive high-grade glioma (3 with WHO Grade IV, 9 with Grade III) were treated with bevacizumab (10 mg/kg) and irinotecan (125 mg/m²) every 2 weeks. There were no complete responses and 2 partial responses (MacDonald criteria).

 

In a randomized phase II study (BO25041) a total of 121 patients aged ≥ 3 years to <18 years with newly diagnosed supratentorial or infratentorial cerebellar or peduncular high-grade glioma (HGG) were treated with post operative radiation therapy (RT) and adjuvant temozolomide (T) with and without bevacizumab: 10 mg/kg every 2 weeks IV.  

 

The study did not meet its primary endpoint of demonstrating a significant improvement of EFS (Central Radiology Review Committee (CRRC)-assessed) when bevacizumab was added to the RT/T arm compared with RT/T alone (HR = 1.44; 95% CI: 0.90, 2.30). These results were consistent with those from various sensitivity analyses and in clinically relevant subgroups. The results for all secondary endpoints (investigator assessed EFS, and ORR and OS) were consistent in showing no improvement associated with the addition of bevacizumab to the RT/T arm compared with the RT/T arm alone.

 

Addition of Avastin to RT/T did not demonstrate clinical benefit in study BO25041 in 60 evaluable children patients with newly diagnosed supratentorial or infratentorial cerebellar or peduncular high-grade glioma (HGG) (See section 4.2 for information on paediatric use).

 

Soft tissue sarcoma

In a randomized phase II study (BO20924) a total of 154 patients aged ≥ 6 months to <18 years with newly diagnosed metastatic rhabdomyosarcoma and non-rhabdomyosarcoma soft tissue sarcoma were treated with standard of care (Induction IVADO/IVA+/- local therapy followed by Maintenance Vinorelbine and cyclophosphamide) with or without bevacizumab (2.5 mg/kg/week) for a total duration of treatment of approximately 18 months. At the time of the final primary analysis, the primary endpoint of EFS by independent central review did not show a statistically significant difference between the two treatment arms, with HR of 0.93 (95% CI: 0.61, 1.41; p-value = 0.72).  The difference in ORR per independent central review was 18% (CI: 0.6%, 35.3%) between the two treatment arms in the few patients who had evaluable tumor at baseline and had a confirmed response prior to receiving any local therapy : 27/75 patients (36.0%, 95% CI: 25.2%, 47.9%) in the Chemo arm and 34/63 patients (54.0%, 95% CI: 40.9%, 66.6%) in the Bv + Chemo arm. The secondary endpoint of Overall Survival (OS) was not mature . Until mature OS results and safety data are available no definitive conclusion can be drawn on the benefit/risk balance.

[…]

 

5.2          Pharmacokinetic properties

[…]

Pharmacokinetics in special populations

The population pharmacokinetics were analysed in adult and pediatric patients to evaluate the effects of demographic characteristics. In adults, tThe results showed no significant difference in the pharmacokinetics of bevacizumab in relation to age.

 

Renal impairment

No trials have been conducted to investigate the pharmacokinetics of bevacizumab in renally impaired patients since the kidneys are not a major organ for bevacizumab metabolism or excretion.

 

Hepatic impairment

No trials have been conducted to investigate the pharmacokinetics of bevacizumab in patients with hepatic impairment since the liver is not a major organ for bevacizumab metabolism or excretion.

 

Paediatric population

The pharmacokinetics of bevacizumab were evaluated in 152 paediatric patientschildren, adolescents and young adults (7 months to 21 years, 5.9 to 125 kg) across 4 clinical studies in paediatrics using a population pharmacokinetic model. The pharmacokinetic results show that the clearance and volume of distribution of bevacizumab were comparable  between paediatric and young adult patients when normaliszed by body weight, with exposure trending lower as body weight decreased. Age was not associated with the pharmacokinetics of bevacizumab when body weight was taken into account.

 

In Study BO20924, the pharmacokinetics of bevacizumab was well characterized by the pediatric population PK model in 70 paediatric patients (1.4 to 17.6 years; 11.6 to 77.5 kg). Based on population PK model simulations, bevacizumab exposure was generally lower in paediatric patients from Study BO20924 as compared to a typical adult patient  at the same dose, and trended lower as body weight decreased.

 

The pharmacokinetics of bevacizumab was well characterized by the paediatric population PK model for 70 patients in Study BO20924 ((1.4 to 17.6 years; 11.6 to 77.5 kg) and 59 patients in Study BO25041 (1 to 17 years; 11.2 to 82.3 kg). In Study BO20924, bevacizumab exposure was generally lower compared to a typical adult patient at the same dose. In Study BO25041, bevacizumab exposure was similar compared to a typical adult at the same dose. In both studies, bevacizumb exposure trended lower as body weight decreased.

10.          DATE OF REVISION OF THE TEXT

 

26 January 2017

 

Updated on 22 February 2017 PIL

Reasons for updating

  • Change to section 2 - use in children and adolescents
  • Change to section 6 - date of revision

Updated on 14 October 2016 SmPC

Reasons for updating

  • Change to section 4.2 - Posology and method of administration
  • Change to section 4.8 - Undesirable effects
  • Change to section 5.1 - Pharmacodynamic properties
  • Change to section 5.2 - Pharmacokinetic properties
  • Change to section 10 - Date of revision of the text

Legal category: Product subject to medical prescription which may not be renewed (A)

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4.2          Posology and method of administration

[…]

Paediatric population

 

The safety and efficacy of bevacizumab in children less than 18 years old and adolescents have not been established. Avastin is not approved for use in patients under the age of 18 years. There is no relevant use of bevacizumab in the paediatric population in the granted indicationsand no recommendation on a posology can be made. Currently available data are described in sections 4.8, 5.1, 5.2 and 5.3 but no recommendation on a posology can be made.

 

Addition of Avastin to standard of care did not demonstrate clinical benefit in clinical trial BO20924, in 71 evaluable children (from age 6 months to less than 18 years old) patients with metastatic Rhabdomyosarcoma and non-Rhabdomyosarcoma Soft Tissue Sarcoma or in paediatric patients with primary CNS tumors.

 

 

Avastin should not be used in children aged 3 years to less than 18 years with recurrent or progressive high-grade glioma because of efficacy concerns (see section 5.1 for results of paediatric trials).

 

Dose reduction for adverse reactions is not recommended. If indicated, therapy should either be permanently discontinued or temporarily suspended as described in section 4.4.

 

 

Method of administration

 

The initial dose should be delivered over 90 minutes as an intravenous infusion. If the first infusion is well tolerated, the second infusion may be administered over 60 minutes. If the 60-minute infusion is well tolerated, all subsequent infusions may be administered over 30 minutes.

 

It should not be administered as an intravenous push or bolus.

 

Dose reduction for adverse reactions is not recommended. If indicated, therapy should either be permanently discontinued or temporarily suspended as described in section 4.4.

[…]


4.8          Undesirable effects

[…]

Paediatric population

The safety and efficacy of Avastin in children less than 18 years old  have and adolescents has not been established.

 

In study BO20924 of Avastin with current standard of care in metastatic rhabdomyosarcoma and non-rhabdomyosarcoma soft tissue sarcoma, the safety profile of Avastin treated children was comparable with that observed in adults treated with Avastin.

 

[…]


5.1          Pharmacodynamic properties

[…]

Paediatric population

The European Medicines Agency has waived the obligation to submit the results of studies, in all subsets of the paediatric population, in breast carcinoma, adenocarcinoma of the colon and rectum, lung carcinoma (small cell and non-small cell carcinoma), kidney and renal pelvis carcinoma (excluding nephroblastoma, nephroblastomatosis, clear cell sarcoma, mesoblastic nephroma, renal medullary carcinoma and rhabdoid tumour of the kidney), ovarian carcinoma (excluding rhabdomyosarcoma and germ cell tumours), fallopian tube carcinoma (excluding rhabdomyosarcoma and germ cell tumours), peritoneal carcinoma (excluding blastomas and sarcomas) and cervix and corpus uteri carcinoma.

 

Anti-tumour activity was not observed in two studies among a total of 30 children aged > 3 years old with relapsed or progressive high-grade glioma when treated with bevacizumab and irinotecan. There is insufficient information to determine the safety and efficacy of bevacizumab in children with newly-diagnosed high-grade glioma.

 

In a single-arm study (PBTC-022), 18 children with recurrent or progressive non-pontine high-grade glioma (including 8 with glioblastoma [WHO Grade IV], 9 with anaplastic astrocytoma [Grade III] and 1 with anaplastic oligodendroglioma [Grade III]) were treated with bevacizumab (10 mg/kg) two weeks apart and then with bevacizumab in combination with CPT-11 (125-350 mg/m²) once every two weeks until progression. There were no objective (partial or complete) radiological responses (MacDonald criteria). Toxicity and adverse reactions included arterial hypertension and fatigue as well as CNS ischaemia with acute neurological deficit. 

 

·      In a retrospective single institution series, 12 consecutive (2005 to 2008) children with relapsed or progressive high-grade glioma (3 with WHO Grade IV, 9 with Grade III) were treated with bevacizumab (10 mg/kg) and irinotecan (125 mg/m²) every 2 weeks. There were no complete responses and 2 partial responses (MacDonald criteria).

 

Anti-tumour activity was not observed Iin a randomized phase II study (BO20924) among a total of 154 patients aged ≥ 6 months to <18 years with newly diagnosed metastatic rhabdomyosarcoma and non-rhabdomyosarcoma soft tissue sarcoma . In this study, children were treated with standard of care (Induction IVADO/IVA+/- local therapy followed by Maintenance Vinorelbine and cyclophosphamide) with or without bevacizumab (2.5 mg/kg/week) for a total duration of treatment of approximately 18 months. At the time of the final primary analysis, the primary endpoint of EFS by independent central review did not show a statistically significant difference between the two treatment arms, with HR of 0.93 (95% CI: 0.61, 1.41; p-value = 0.72).  The difference in ORR per independent central review was 18% (CI: 0.6%, 35.3%) between the two treatment arms in the few patients who had evaluable tumor at baseline and had a confirmed response prior to receiving any local therapy : 27/75 patients (36.0%, 95% CI: 25.2%, 47.9%) in the Chemo arm and 34/63 patients (54.0%, 95% CI: 40.9%, 66.6%) in the Bv + Chemo arm. The secondary endpoint of Overall Survival (OS) was not mature . Until mature OS results are available No definitive conclusion can be drawn on the benefit/risk balance.

 

Addition of Avastin to standard of care did not demonstrate clinical benefit in clinical trial BO20924, in 71 evaluable children (from age 6 months to less than 18 years old) patients with metastatic Rhabdomyosarcoma and non-Rhabdomyosarcoma Soft Tissue Sarcoma

(see section 4.2 for information on paediatric use).

 

The incidence of AEs, including Grade ³ 3 AEs and SAEs, was similar between the two treatment arms.  No AEs leading to death occurred in either treatment arm; all deaths were attributed to disease progression.  Bevacizumab addition to multimodal standard of care treatment seemed to be tolerated in this paediatric population.

 

Accordingly, at time of the primary endpoint final anaylsis, the benefit/risk balance of  the addition of Bevacizumab to standard of care in paediatric patients with metastatic rhabdomyosarcoma or non-rhabdomyosarcoma soft tissue sarcoma is not established yet.


5.2          Pharmacokinetic properties

[…]

Paediatric population

The pharmacokinetics of bevacizumab were evaluated in 152 have been studied in a limited number of paediatric patients . (7 months to 21 years, 5.9 to 125kg) across 4 clinical studies in paediatrics using a population pharmacokinetic model. The resulting pharmacokinetic results show data suggest that the clearance and volume of distribution and clearance of bevacizumab were comparable to that in adults with solid tumours between paediatric and adult patients when normalized by body weight. Age was not associated with the pharmacokinetics of bevacizumab when body weight was taken into account.

 

In Study BO20924, the pharmacokinetics of bevacizumab was well characterized by the pediatric population PK model in 70 paediatric patients (1.4 to 17.6 years; 11.6 to 77.5 kg). Based on population PK model simulations, bevacizumab exposure was generally lower in paediatric patients from Study BO20924 as compared to a typical adult patient  at the same dose, and trended lower as body weight decreased.


10.          DATE OF REVISION OF THE TEXT

 

15 September 2016

 

Updated on 10 June 2016 SmPC

Reasons for updating

  • Change to section 4.1 - Therapeutic indications
  • Change to section 4.2 - Posology and method of administration
  • Change to section 4.5 - Interaction with other medicinal products and other forms of interaction
  • Change to section 4.8 - Undesirable effects
  • Change to section 5.1 - Pharmacodynamic properties
  • Change to section 10 - Date of revision of the text

Legal category: Product subject to medical prescription which may not be renewed (A)

Free text change information supplied by the pharmaceutical company

Underlined text has been added, text with strike-through deleted:

4.1          Therapeutic indications

[…]

Bevacizumab, in combination with erlotinib, is indicated for first-line treatment of adult patients with unresectable advanced, metastatic or recurrent non-squamous non-small cell lung cancer with Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) activating mutations (see Section 5.1).

[…]

4.2          Posology and method of administration

[…]

Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC)

 

First-line treatment of non-squamous NSCLC in combination with platinum-based chemotherapy

 

Avastin is administered in addition to platinum-based chemotherapy for up to 6 cycles of treatment followed by Avastin as a single agent until disease progression.

The recommended dose of Avastin is 7.5 mg/kg or 15 mg/kg of body weight given once every 3 weeks as an intravenous infusion.

Clinical benefit in NSCLC patients has been demonstrated with both 7.5 mg/kg and 15 mg/kg doses (see section 5.1).

It is recommended that treatment be continued until progression of the underlying disease or until unacceptable toxicity.

 

First-line treatment of non-squamous NSCLC with EGFR activating mutations in combination with erlotinib

 

EGFR mutation testing should be performed prior to initiation of treatment with the combination of Avastin and erlotinib. It is important that a well-validated and robust methodology is chosen to avoid false negative or false positive determinations.

The recommended dose of Avastin when used in addition to erlotinib is 15 mg/kg of body weight given once every 3 weeks as an intravenous infusion.

It is recommended that the treatment with Avastin in addition to erlotinib is continued until disease progression.

 

For the posology and method of administration of erlotinib, pPlease refer to the full erlotinib prescribing information for erlotinib for patient selection and posology.

[…]

4.5          Interaction with other medicinal products and other forms of interaction

 

Effect of antineoplastic agents on bevacizumab pharmacokinetics

No clinically relevant pharmacokinetic interaction of co-administered chemotherapy on Avastin bevacizumab pharmacokinetics has been  was observed based on the results of a population PK pharmacokineticanalysis analyses. There was were neither statistically significantce nor clinically relevant differences in bevacizumab clearance of Avastin in patients receiving Avastin monotherapy compared to patients receiving Avastin in combination with interferon alfa-2a, erlotinib or other chemotherapies (IFL, 5-FU/LV, carboplatin/paclitaxel, capecitabine, doxorubicin or cisplatin/gemcitabine).

 

Effect of bevacizumab on the pharmacokinetics of other antineoplastic agents

No clinically relevant interaction of bevacizumab was observed on the pharmacokinetics of co-administered interferon alpha 2a, erlotinib (and its active metabolite OSI-420), or the chemotherapies irinotecan (and its active metabolite SN38), capecitabine, oxaliplatin (as determined by measurement of free and total platinum), and cisplatin. Conclusions on the impact of bevacizumab on gemcitabine pharmacokinetics cannot be drawn.

 

Results from a dedicated drug-drug interaction trial demonstrated no significant effect of bevacizumab on the pharmacokinetics of irinotecan and its active metabolite SN38.

 

Results from one trial in metastatic colorectal cancer patients demonstrated no significant effect of bevacizumab on the pharmacokinetics of capecitabine and its metabolites, and on the pharmacokinetics of oxaliplatin, as determined by measurement of free and total platinum.

 

Results from one trial in renal cancer patients demonstrated no significant effect of bevacizumab on the pharmacokinetics of interferon alfa-2a.

 

The potential effect of bevacizumab on the pharmacokinetics of cisplatin and gemcitabine was investigated in non-squamous NSCLC patients. Trial results demonstrated no significant effect of bevacizumab on the pharmacokinetics of cisplatin. Due to high inter-patient variability and limited sampling, the results from that trial do not allow firm conclusions to be drawn on the impact of bevacizumab on gemcitabine pharmacokinetics.

[…]

4.8          Undesirable effects

[…]

Some of the adverse reactions are reactions commonly seen with chemotherapy; however, Avastin may exacerbate these reactions when combined with chemotherapeutic agents. Examples include palmar-plantar erythrodysaesthesia syndrome with pegylated liposomal doxorubicin or capecitabine, peripheral sensory neuropathy with paclitaxel or oxaliplatin, and nail disorders or alopecia with paclitaxel, and paronychia with erlotinib.

[…]

Hypertension (see section 4.4)

In clinical trials, with the exception of study JO25567, the overall An increased incidence of hypertension (all gGrades) ranged of up to 42.1% has been observed in Avastin-treated patients in clinical trials in the Avastin containing arms compared with up to 14% in the control arms those treated with comparator. The overall incidence of NCI-CTC Grade 3 and 4 hypertension (requiring oral anti‑hypertensive medicines) in patients receiving Avastin ranged from 0.4% to 17.9%. Grade 4 hypertension (hypertensive crisis) occurred in up to 1.0% of patients treated with Avastin and chemotherapy compared to up to 0.2% of patients treated with the same chemotherapy alone (NCI-CTCAE v.3).

 

In study JO25567, all grade hypertension was observed in 77.3% of the patients who received Avastin in combination with erlotinib as first-line treatment for non-squamous NSCLC with EGFR activating mutations, compared to 14.3% of patients treated with erlotinib alone. Grade 3 hypertension was 60.0% in patients treated with Avastin in combination with erlotinib compared to 11.7% in patients treated with erlotinib alone. There were no grade 4 or 5 hypertension events.

[…]

In clinical trials, the overall incidence of arterial thromboembolic reactions ranged up to 3.8% in the Avastin containing arms compared with up to 1.7% in the chemotherapy control arms. Fatal outcome was reported in 0.8% of patients receiving Avastin compared to 0.5% in patients receiving chemotherapy alone. Cerebrovascular accidents (including transient ischaemic attacks) were reported in up to 2.72.3% of patients treated with Avastin in combination with chemotherapy compared to up to 0.5% of patients treated with chemotherapy alone. Myocardial infarction was reported in up to 1.4% of patients treated with Avastin in combination with chemotherapy compared to up to 0.7% of patients treated with chemotherapy alone.

5.1          Pharmacodynamic properties

[…]

Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC)

 

First-line treatment of non-squamous NSCLC in combination with platinum-based chemotherapy

 

[…]

First-line treatment of non-squamous NSCLC with EGFR activating mutations in combination with erlotinib

 

JO25567

Study JO25567 was a randomized, open-label, multi-center Phase II study conducted in Japan to evaluate the efficacy and safety of Avastin used in addition to erlotinib in patients with non-squamous NSCLC with EGFR activating mutations (exon 19 deletion or exon 21 L858R mutation) who had not received prior systemic therapy for Stage IIIB/IV or recurrent disease.

The primary endpoint was progression-free survival (PFS) based on independent review assessment. Secondary endpoints included overall survival, response rate, disease control rate, duration of response, and safety and Health Related Quality of Life based on the FACT-L (Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy for Patients with Lung Cancer) questionnaire.

EGFR mutation status was determined for each patient prior to patient screening and 154 patients were randomised to receive either erlotinib + Avastin (erlotinib 150 mg oral daily + Avastin [15 mg/kg IV every 3 weeks]) or erlotinib monotherapy (150 mg oral daily) until disease progression (PD) or unacceptable toxicity. In the absence of PD, discontinuation of one component of study treatment in the erlotinib + Avastin arm did not lead to discontinuation of the other component of study treatment as specified in the study protocol.

 

The efficacy results of the study are presented in Table 14.

Table 14                     Efficacy results for study JO25567

 

Erlotinib

N = 77#

Erlotinib + Avastin

N = 75#

PFS^ (months)

Median

 

9.7

 

16.0

HR (95% CI)

p-value

0.54 (0.36; 0.79)

0.0015

Overall Response Rate

Rate (n)

p-value

 

63.6% (49)

 

69.3% (52)

0.4951

Duration of Response (months)

Median

 

9.3

 

13.3

HR (95% CI)

p-value

0.68 (0.43; 1.10)

0.118

Disease Control Rate

Rate

p-value

 

88.3%

 

98.7%

0.0177

Overall Survival* (months)

Median

 

48.5NR

 

48.4NR

HR (95% CI)

p-value

0.91 (0.56; 1.46)1.04 (0.61- 1.77)

0.68380.8926

# A total of 154 patients ​​(ECOG Performance Status  0 or 1)  were randomized. However two of the randomized patients discontinued the study before receiving any study treatment

^ Blinded independent review (protocol-defined primary analysis)

* Exploratory analysis; OS updated analysis at clinical cut-off  on Nov 201428 October 2015, approx. 4535% patient had died and OS is therefore considered immature.

CI, confidence interval; HR, Hazard ratio from unstratified Cox regression analysis; NR, not reached.

 

In the open label study JO25567, Health Related Quality of life (HRQoL) was assessed by the FACT-L total and trial outcome index (TOI) scores and lung cancer symptoms, as assessed by the FACT-L lung cancer symptom subscale (LCS). During the progression-free time, mean baseline FACT-L scores were maintained in both treatment arms. There were no clinically meaningful differences in the FACT-L HRQoL observed between the two treatment arms. Of note, patients in the erlotinib + Avastin arm were treated for a longer duration and received intravenous administration of Avastin as opposed to oral erlotinib monotherapy in the control arm.

[…]

 

10.          DATE OF REVISION OF THE TEXT

02 June 2016

 

Updated on 8 June 2016 PIL

Reasons for updating

  • Change to side-effects
  • Change to date of revision
  • Changes to therapeutic indications

Updated on 2 June 2016 SmPC

Reasons for updating

  • Change to section 4.8 - Undesirable effects
  • Change to section 10 - Date of revision of the text

Legal category: Product subject to medical prescription which may not be renewed (A)

Free text change information supplied by the pharmaceutical company

4.8       Undesirable effects

 

Summary of the safety profile

 

The overall safety profile of Avastin is based on data from over 5,4200 patients with various malignancies, predominantly treated with Avastin in combination with chemotherapy in clinical trials.

 

[ … ]

 

Description of selected serious adverse reactions

 

Gastrointestinal (GI) perforations and Fistulae (see section 4.4)

Avastin has been associated with serious cases of gastrointestinal perforation. Gastrointestinal perforations have been reported in clinical trials with an incidence of less than 1% in patients with metastatic breast cancer or non-squamous non-small cell lung cancer,  up to 1.3% in patients with metastatic breast cancer,  up to 2.0% in patients with metastatic renal cell cancer or in patients with ovarian cancer receiving front-line treatment, and up to 2.7% (including gastrointestinal fistula and abscess) in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer.

 

[ … ]

 

 

Thromboembolism (see section 4.4)

 

Arterial thromboembolism: An increased incidence of arterial thromboembolic reactions was observed in patients treated with Avastin across indications, including cerebrovascular accidents, myocardial infarction, transient ischaemic attacks, and other arterial thromboembolic reactions.

 

In clinical trials, the overall incidence of arterial thromboembolic reactions ranged up to 3.8% in the Avastin containing arms compared with up to 2.11.7% in the chemotherapy control arms. Fatal outcome was reported in 0.8% of patients receiving Avastin compared to 0.5% in patients receiving chemotherapy alone. Cerebrovascular accidents (including transient ischaemic attacks) were reported in up to 2.3% of patients treated with Avastin in combination with chemotherapy compared to 0.5% of patients treated with chemotherapy alone. Myocardial infarction was reported in 1.4% of patients treated with Avastin in combination with chemotherapy compared to 0.7% of patients treated with chemotherapy alone.

 

[ … ]

 

10.       DATE OF REVISION OF THE TEXT

 

28 April 2016

Updated on 19 November 2015 SmPC

Reasons for updating

  • Change to section 4.4 - Special warnings and precautions for use
  • Change to section 4.8 - Undesirable effects
  • Change to section 10 - Date of revision of the text

Legal category: Product subject to medical prescription which may not be renewed (A)

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4.4          Special warnings and precautions for use

[…]

Proteinuria (see section 4.8)

Patients with a history of hypertension may be at increased risk for the development of proteinuria when treated with Avastin. There is evidence suggesting that all Grade (US National Cancer Institute-Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events [NCI-CTCAE v.3]) proteinuria may be related to the dose. Monitoring of proteinuria by dipstick urinalysis is recommended prior to starting and during therapy. Grade 4 proteinuria (nephrotic syndrome) was seen in up to 1.4% of patients treated with Avastin. Therapy should be permanently discontinued in patients who develop Grade 4 proteinuria (nephrotic syndrome) (NCI-CTCAE v.3).

[…]

4.8          Undesirable effects

[…]

Proteinuria ranged in severity from clinically asymptomatic, transient, trace proteinuria to nephrotic syndrome, with the great majority as Grade 1 proteinuria (NCI-CTCAE v.3). Grade 3 proteinuria was reported in up to 8.1% of treated patients. Grade 4 proteinuria (nephrotic syndrome) was seen in up to 1.4% of treated patients. The proteinuria seen in clinical trials was not associated with renal dysfunction and rarely required permanent discontinuation of therapy. Testing for proteinuria is recommended prior to start of Avastin therapy. In most clinical trials urine protein levels of ³ 2g/24 hrs led to the holding of Avastin until recovery to < 2g/24 hrs.

[…]

Clinical trials have shown that transient increases in serum creatinine (ranging between 1.5-1.9 times baseline level), both with and without proteinuria, are associated with the use of Avastin. The observed increase in serum creatinine was not associated with a higher incidence of clinical manifestations of renal impairment in patients treated with Avastin.

[…]

10.          DATE OF REVISION OF THE TEXT

22 October 2015

 

Updated on 18 November 2015 PIL

Reasons for updating

  • Change to side-effects
  • Change to date of revision

Updated on 24 August 2015 SmPC

Reasons for updating

  • Change to section 4.2 - Posology and method of administration
  • Change to section 4.4 - Special warnings and precautions for use
  • Change to section 4.8 - Undesirable effects
  • Change to section 10 - Date of revision of the text

Legal category: Product subject to medical prescription which may not be renewed (A)

Free text change information supplied by the pharmaceutical company

Underlined text has been added, text with strike-through deleted:

 

4.2          Posology and method of administration

[…]

Paediatric population

 

The safety and efficacy of bevacizumab in children and adolescents have not been established. Avastin is not approved for use in patients under the age of 18 years. There is no relevant use of bevacizumab in the paediatric population in the granted indications. Currently available data are described in sections 4.8, 5.1, 5.2 and 5.3 but no recommendation on a posology can be made.

Avastin should not be used in children aged 3 years to less than 18 years with recurrent or progressive high-grade glioma because of efficacy concerns (see section 5.1 for results of paediatric trials).

[…]

 

4.4          Special warnings and precautions for use

In order to improve the traceability of biological medicinal products, the trade name and the batch number of the administered product should be clearly recorded (or stated) in the patient file.

[…]

 

4.8          Undesirable effects

[…]

Frequency not known:  Non-mandibular osteonecrosisa,f

f Observed in pediatric population only

[…]

Paediatric population

The safety of Avastin in children and adolescents has not been established. Avastin is not approved for use in patients under the age of 18 years. In published literature reports, cases of non-mandibular osteonecrosis have been observed in patients under the age of 18 years treated with Avastin (see section 5.3).

[…]

Musculoskeletal and connective tissue disorders

Cases of Oosteonecrosis of the Jjaw (ONJ) have been reported in patients treated with Avastin, most of which occurred in patients who had identified risk factors for ONJ, in particular exposure to intravenous bisphosphonates and/or a history of dental disease requiring invasive dental procedures (see also section 4.4)

Cases of non-mandibular osteonecrosis have been observed in Avastin treated paediatric patients (see section 4.8, Paediatric population).

 

[…]

10.          DATE OF REVISION OF THE TEXT

 

23 July 2015

 

Updated on 19 August 2015 PIL

Reasons for updating

  • Change to warnings or special precautions for use
  • Change to date of revision

Updated on 8 April 2015 SmPC

Reasons for updating

  • Change to section 4.1 - Therapeutic indications
  • Change to section 4.2 - Posology and method of administration
  • Change to section 4.8 - Undesirable effects
  • Change to section 5.1 - Pharmacodynamic properties
  • Change to section 5.3 - Preclinical safety data
  • Change to section 9 - Date of renewal of authorisation
  • Change to section 10 - Date of revision of the text

Legal category: Product subject to medical prescription which may not be renewed (A)

Free text change information supplied by the pharmaceutical company

Underlined text has been added, text with strike through deleted:

4.1          Therapeutic indications

[…]

Bevacizumab, in combination with paclitaxel and cisplatin or, alternatively, paclitaxel and topotecan in patients who cannot receive platinum therapy, is indicated for the treatment of adult patients with persistent, recurrent, or metastatic carcinoma of the cervix (see Section 5.1).

 

4.2          Posology and method of administration

[…]

Cervical Cancer

Avastin is administered in combination with one of the following chemotherapy regimens: paclitaxel and cisplatin or paclitaxel and topotecan.

The recommended dose of Avastin is 15 mg/kg of body weight given once every 3 weeks as an intravenous infusion.

It is recommended that treatment be continued until progression of the underlying disease or until unacceptable toxicity (see section 5.1).

[…]

4.4          Special warnings and precautions for use

In order to improve the traceability of biological medicinal products, the trade name of the administered product should be clearly recorded (or stated) in the patient file.

Gastrointestinal (GI) perforations and Fistulae (see section 4.8)

Patients may be at an increased risk for the development of gastrointestinal perforation and gall bladder perforation when treated with Avastin. Intra-abdominal inflammatory process may be a risk factor for gastrointestinal perforations in patients with metastatic carcinoma of the colon or rectum, therefore, caution should be exercised when treating these patients. Prior radiation is a risk factor for GI perforation in patients treated for persistent, recurrent or metastatic cervical cancer with Avastin and all patients with GI perforation had a history of prior radiation. Therapy should be permanently discontinued in patients who develop gastrointestinal perforation.

 

GI-vaginal Fistulae in study GOG-0240

Patients treated for persistent, recurrent, or metastatic cervical cancer with Avastin are at increased risk of fistulae between the vagina and any part of the GI tract (Gastrointestinal-vaginal fistulae). Prior radiation is a major risk factor for the development of GI-vaginal fistulae and all patients with GI-vaginal fistulae had a history of prior radiation. Recurrence of cancer within the field of prior radiation is an additional important risk factor for the development of GI-vaginal fistulae.

 

Non-GI Fistulae (see section 4.8)

Patients may be at increased risk for the development of fistulae when treated with Avastin.

Permanently discontinue Avastin in patients with tracheoesophageal (TE) fistula or any Grade 4 fistula [US National Cancer Institute-Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (NCI-CTCAE v.3)]. Limited information is available on the continued use of Avastin in patients with other fistulae.
In cases of internal fistula not arising in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, discontinuation of Avastin should be considered.

[…]

 

Venous thromboembolism (see section 4.8)

Patients may be at risk of developing venous thromboembolic reactions, including pulmonary embolism under Avastin treatment.

Patients treated for  persistent, recurrent, or metastatic cervical cancer with Avastin in combination with paclitaxel and cisplatin may be at increased risk of venous thromboembolic events.

Avastin should be discontinued in patients with life-threatening (Grade 4) thromboembolic reactions, including pulmonary embolism (NCI-CTCAE v.3). Patients with thromboembolic reactions ≤ Grade 3 need to be closely monitored (NCI-CTCAE v.3).

[…]

Neutropenia and infections (see section 4.8)

Increased rates of severe neutropenia, febrile neutropenia, or infection with or without severe neutropenia (including some fatalities) have been observed in patients treated with some myelotoxic chemotherapy regimens plus Avastin in comparison to chemotherapy alone. This has mainly been seen in combination with platinum- or taxane-based therapies in the treatment of NSCLC, and mBC, and in combination with paclitaxel and topotecan in persistent, recurrent, or metastatic cervical cancer.

[…]

4.8          Undesirable effects

[…]

Table 1: Adverse Reactions by Frequency

 

System organ class

Very Common

Common

Uncommon

Rare

Very Rare

Frequency Not Known

Infections and infestations

 

Sepsis,

Abscessb,d,

Cellulitis, Infection,

Urinary tract infection

 

Necrotising

fasciitis a

 

 

Blood and lymphatic system disorders

Febrile

neutropenia,

Leucopenia,

Neutropeniab,

Thrombo-cytopenia

Anaemia, Lymphopenia

 

 

 

 

Immune system disorders

 

Hypersensitivity, infusion reactionsa,b,d

 

 

 

 

Metabolism and nutrition disorders

Anorexia

Dehydration

 

 

 

 

Nervous system disorders

Peripheral sensory

neuropathyb,

Dysarthria,

Headache,

Dysguesia

Cerebrovascular

accident,

Syncope,

Somnolence

 

 

Posterior

reversible

encephalo-

pathy

syndrome a,b,d

Hypertensive

encephalo-

pathya

 

Eye disorders

 

 

Eye disorder,

Lacrimation increased

 

 

 

 

 

Cardiac disorders

 

Congestive heart

failureb,d,

Supraventricular

 tachycardia

 

 

 

 

Vascular disorders

Hypertensionb,d,

Thrombo-embolism

(venous)b,d

Thrombo-embolism

(arterial)b,d,

Haemorrhageb,d,

Deep vein

thrombosis

 

 

 

Renal

thrombotic

microangiopathya,b

Respiratory, thoracic and mediastinal disorders

Dyspnoea,

Rhinitis

Pulmonary

haemorrhage/

Haemoptysisb,d,

Pulmonary

embolism,

Epistaxis,

Hypoxia,

Dysphoniaa

 

 

 

Pulmonary

hypertensiona,

Nasal septum

perforationa

Gastrointestinal disorders

Rectal

haemorrhage,

Stomatitis,

Constipation,

Diarrhoea,

Nausea,

Vomiting, Abdominal pain

Gastrointestinal  perforationb,d,

Intestinal

perforation,

Ileus,

Intestinal

obstruction,

Abdominal pain,Recto-vaginal fistulaed,e,

Gastrointestinal

Disorder,

Proctalgia

 

 

 

Gastrointestinal

ulcera

Hepatobiliary disorders

 

 

 

 

 

Gallbladder perforationa,b

Skin and subcutaneous tissue disorders

Wound healing

complicationsb,d,

Exfoliative

dermatitis,

Dry skin,

Skin discoloration

Palmar-plantar

erythro-dysaesthesia

syndrome

 

 

 

 

 

Musculoskeletal  and connective tissue disorders

Arthralgia

Fistulab,d,

Myalgia,

Muscular weakness,

Back pain

 

 

 

Osteonecrosis of the jawa,b

Renal and urinary disorders

Proteinuriab,d

 

 

 

 

 

Reproductive system and breast disorders

Ovarian

failureb,c,d 

 

Pelvic Pain

 

 

 

 

Congenital, familial, and genetic disorder

 

 

 

 

 

Foetal abnormalitiesa,b

General disorders and administration site conditions

Asthenia,

Fatigue,

Pyrexia,

Pain,

Mucosal inflammation

Lethargy

 

 

 

 

 

Investigations

Weight decreased

 

 

 

 

 

 

 When events were noted as both all grade and grade 3-5 adverse drug reactions in clinical trials, the highest frequency observed in patients has been reported. Data are unadjusted for the differential time on treatment. 

 

a For further information please refer to Table 3 'Adverse reactions reported in post-marketing setting.'

 

b Terms represent a group of events that describe a medical concept rather than a single condition or MedDRA (Medical Dictionary for Regulatory Activities) preferred term.  This group of medical terms may involve the same underlying pathophysiology (e.g. arterial thromboembolic reactions include cerebrovascular accident, myocardial infarction, transient ischaemic attack and other arterial thromboembolic reactions).

 

 

c Based on a substudy from NSABP C-08 with 295 patients

 

 

 

d For additional information refer below within section "Further information on selected serious adverse reactions."

e Recto-vaginal fistulae are the most common fistulae in the GI-vaginal fistula category.

 

 

Table 2: Severe Adverse Reactions by Frequency

 

System organ class

Very Common

Common

Uncommon

Rare

Very Rare

Frequency Not Known

Infections and infestations

 

Sepsis,

Cellulitis,

Abscessa,b,

Infection,

Urinary tract infection

 

 

 

Necrotising

fasciitisc

Blood and lymphatic system disorders

Febrile

neutropenia,

Leucopenia,

Neutropeniaa,

Thrombo-cytopenia

Anaemia, Lymphopenia

 

 

 

 

Immune system disorders

 

 

 

 

 

Hypersensitivity, infusion reactions a,b,c

Metabolism and nutrition disorders

 

Dehydration

 

 

 

 

Nervous system disorders

 

Peripheral sensory

neuropathya

Cerebrovascular

accident,

Syncope,

Somnolence,

Headache

 

 

 

Posterior

reversible

encephalo-

pathy

syndrome a,b,c,

Hypertensive

encephalo-

pathyc 

Cardiac disorders

 

Congestive heart

failurea,b,

Supraventricular

tachycardia

 

 

 

 

Vascular disorders

Hypertensiona,b

Thromboembolism arteriala,b,

Haemorrhagea,b,

Thromboembolism

(venous)a,b

Deep vein

thrombosis

 

 

 

Renal

thrombotic

microangiopathyb,c

Respiratory, thoracic and mediastinal disorders

 

Pulmonary

haemorrhage/

Haemoptysisa,b,

Pulmonary

embolism,

Epistaxis,

Dyspnoea,

Hypoxia

 

 

 

Pulmonary

hypertensionc,

Nasal septum

perforationc

Gastrointestinal disorders

Diarrhoea,

Nausea,

Vomiting,

Abdominal pain

Intestinal

perforation,

Ileus,

Intestinal

obstruction,

Recto-vaginal fistulaec,d

Abdominal pain,,

Gastrointestinal

disorder,

Stomatitis,

Proctalgia

 

 

 

 

Gastrointestinal

perforationa,b,

Gastrointestinal

ulcerc,

Rectal haemorrhage

 

Hepatobiliary disorders

 

 

 

 

 

Gallbladder perforation b,c

Skin and subcutaneous tissue disorders

 

Wound healing

complicationsa,b,

Palmar-plantar

erythrodysaesthesia

syndrome