Anadin Analgesic Tablets

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Summary of Product Characteristics last updated on medicines.ie: 8/1/2016
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Pfizer Consumer Healthcare

Pfizer Consumer Healthcare

Company Products

Medicine NameActive Ingredients
Medicine Name Advil Cold and Flu Coated Tablet Active Ingredients Ibuprofen, Pseudoephedrine Hydrochloride
Medicine Name Anadin Analgesic Tablets Active Ingredients Acetylsalicylic Acid, Caffeine
Medicine Name Anadin Maximum Strength Capsules Active Ingredients Acetylsalicylic acid (Aspirin), Caffeine
Medicine Name Caltrate 500 mg / 1000 IU, chewable tablets Active Ingredients Calcium Carbonate, Colecalciferol (Vitamin D3)
Medicine Name Caltrate 600mg/400IU Film-coated Tablets Active Ingredients Calcium Carbonate, Vitamin D3
Medicine Name Ibuprofen 200mg Soft Capsules Active Ingredients Ibuprofen
Medicine Name Nexium Control 20 mg gastro-resistant tablets Active Ingredients Esomeprazole magnesium trihydrate
Medicine Name Nexium Control Capsules 20mg Esomeprazole Active Ingredients Esomeprazole magnesium trihydrate
Medicine Name Paracetamol 500 mg Film Coated Tablets Active Ingredients Paracetamol
Medicine Name PARAEXTRA Hard Capsules Active Ingredients Caffeine, Paracetamol
Medicine Name Paraeze Hard Capsules Active Ingredients Caffeine, Paracetamol
Medicine Name Robitussin Chesty Cough Active Ingredients Guaifenesin
Medicine Name Robitussin Dry Cough Active Ingredients Dextromethorphan Hydrobromide
Medicine Name Robitussin Plus Active Ingredients Guaifenesin, Pseudoephedrine Hydrochloride
1 - 0 of 14 items.Total: Infinity pages

When a pharmaceutical company changes any document, a new version is published on medicines.ie. For each version, we show the dates it was published on medicines.ie and the reasons for change.

Updated on 8 January 2016 PIL

Reasons for updating

  • Change to date of revision
  • Correction of spelling/typing errors

Updated on 8 January 2016 SmPC

Reasons for updating

  • New SmPC for new product

Legal category: Supply through general sale

Updated on 8 January 2016 SmPC

Reasons for updating

  • Change to section 6.1 - List of excipients
  • Change to section 10 - Date of revision of the text

Legal category: Supply through general sale

Free text change information supplied by the pharmaceutical company

In section 6.1, the spelling of sulphate has changed to sulfate.

In section 10, the date of revision has changed to December

Updated on 8 January 2016 PIL

Reasons for updating

  • New PIL for new product

Updated on 18 December 2015 SmPC

Reasons for updating

  • Change to section 3 - Pharmaceutical form
  • Change to section 10 - Date of revision of the text

Legal category: Supply through general sale

Free text change information supplied by the pharmaceutical company

In section 10, the date of revision has been updated to March 2015.

In section 3, The following text has been removed: debossed on both faces with ‘ANADIN’

the following text has been added:

The tablets have ‘325/15’ embossed on both sides.

Updated on 23 July 2015 PIL

Reasons for updating

  • Change to date of revision
  • Change to name of manufacturer

Updated on 20 August 2014 SmPC

Reasons for updating

  • Change to section 1 - Name of medicinal product
  • Change to section 2 - Qualitative and quantitative composition
  • Change to section 4.4 - Special warnings and precautions for use
  • Change to section 4.6 - Pregnancy and lactation
  • Change to Section 4.8 – Undesirable effects - how to report a side effect
  • Change to section 5.1 - Pharmacodynamic properties
  • Change to section 5.2 - Pharmacokinetic properties
  • Change to section 6 - Pharmaceutical particulars
  • Change to section 6.1 - List of excipients
  • Change to section 8 - MA number
  • Change to section 10 - Date of revision of the text

Legal category: Supply through general sale

Free text change information supplied by the pharmaceutical company

Quinine Sulphate has been reclassified as an excipient (rather than active ingredient). This has impacted the following sections:
1; 2; 4.6; 5.1; 5.2; 6.1

In section 4.4, the following text has been added:

In patients suffering from severe glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G-6-PD) deficiency, aspirin is known to rarely cause haemolytic anaemia.



The following text has been removed:

As NSAIDs  can interfere with platelet function , they should be used with caution in patients with intercranial haemorrhage and bleeding diathesis.



In 4.6, the title has been updated to match QRD template, and sub headings 'Pregnancy', 'Breast feeding' and 'Fertility' have been added. The following text has been added:

Fertility

 If acetylsalicylic acid is used by a woman attempting to conceive the dose should be kept as low as possible and the duration of use as short as possible. Animal studies have shown an increased risk of pre -implantation loss and various malformations including cardiovascular.



In 4.8, the undesirable effects 'anaemia, aplastic anaemia, pancytopenia' have been added. The HPRA reporting information has also been added.

The title of 6.6. has been updated to match QRD wording.

In section 8, MA number has been reformatted, with zeros added: PA0822/165/001

In section 10, the date of revision has been updated from December 2012 to August 2014.

Updated on 18 August 2014 PIL

Reasons for updating

  • Change to warnings or special precautions for use
  • Change to side-effects
  • Change to date of revision
  • Addition of information on reporting a side effect.
  • Correction of spelling/typing errors

Updated on 19 December 2012 SmPC

Reasons for updating

  • Change to marketing authorisation holder

Legal category: Supply through general sale

Free text change information supplied by the pharmaceutical company

MAH is Pfizer Healthcare Ireland, Citywest Business Campus, Dublin 24.
PA 822/165/1.

Updated on 13 December 2012 PIL

Reasons for updating

  • Change to marketing authorisation holder
  • Change to name of manufacturer

Updated on 20 June 2011 SmPC

Reasons for updating

  • Change to section 4.6 - Pregnancy and lactation
  • Change to section 4.8 - Undesirable effects
  • Change to section 4.9 - Overdose
  • Change to section 5.1 - Pharmacodynamic properties
  • Change to section 5.2 - Pharmacokinetic properties
  • Change to section 4.2 - Posology and method of administration
  • Change to section 4.3 - Contraindications
  • Change to section 4.4 - Special warnings and precautions for use
  • Change to section 4.5 - Interaction with other medicinal products and other forms of interaction

Legal category: Supply through general sale

Free text change information supplied by the pharmaceutical company

4.2 Posology and Method of Administration

Adults and Adolescents over 16 years: Take 2 tablets every 4 hours if necessary. Do not exceed 12 tablets in any 24 hour period.
Take 2 tablets every 4 hours if necessary. Do not exceed 12 tablets in any 24 hour period.

4.3 Contra-indications

Patients with a history of hypersensitivity reactions (e.g. bronchospasm, rhinitis, urticaria) in response to Anadin Analgesic Film-coated Tablets, aspirin or other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs or any of the other constituents.
Children and adolescents under 16 years.
Breast-feeding.
Last-trimester of pregnancy.
Concurrent anti-coagulant therapy.
Patients with severe renal failure.
Intake of more than 15mg methotrexate per week.


4.4 Special Warnings and Precautions for Use

As NSAIDs can interfere with platelet function, they should be used with caution in patients with intracranial haemorrhage and bleeding diathesis.

4.5 Interactions with other medicinal products and other forms of interactions

Diuretics, ACE inhibitors and Angiotensin II Antagonists: NSAIDs may reduce the
effect of diuretics and other antihypertensive drugs. In some patients with compromised renal function (e.g. dehydrated patients or elderly patients with compromised renal function) the co-administration of an ACE inhibitor or Angiotensin II antagonist and agents that inhibit cyclo-oxygenase may result in further deterioration of renal function, including possible acute renal failure, which is usually reversible. These
interactions should be considered in patients taking Anadin Analgesic Film-coated Tablets concomitantly with ACE inhibitors or angiotensin II antagonists. Therefore, the combination should be administered with caution, especially in the elderly. Patients should be adequately hydrated and consideration should be given to monitoring of renal function after initiation of concomitant therapy, and periodically thereafter.


4.6 Pregnancy and Lactation

Acetylsalicylic acid should not be used during the first and second trimester of pregnancy unless clearly necessary. If acetylsalicylic acid is used by a woman attempting to conceive, or during the first and second trimesters, the dose should be kept as low as possible and the duration of use as short as possible. It has been suggested in epidemiological studies that prostaglandin synthesis inhibition in early pregnancy is associated with an increased risk of miscarriage, cardiac malformation and gastroschisis. Animal studies have shown an increased risk of pre and post-implantation loss and various malformations including cardiovascular.

In the third trimester, there is also the risk of cardiopulmonary toxicity (premature closure of the ductus arteriosus and pulmonary hypertension) and renal dysfunction.

4.9 Overdose

Salicylate poisoning is usually associated with plasma concentrations > 350 mg/l (2.5 mmol/l). Most adult deaths occur in patients whose concentrations exceed 700 mg/l (5.1 mmol/L). Single dose less than 100mg/kg are unlikely to cause serious poisoning.

Aspirin
Common features include vomiting, dehydration, tinnitus, vertigo, deafness, sweating, warm extremities with bounding pulses, increased respiratory rate and hyperventilation. Some degree of acid-base disturbance is present in most cases. A mixed respiratory alkalosis and metabolic acidosis with normal or high arterial pH (normal or reduced hydrogen ion concentration) is usual in adults and children over the age of four years old. In children aged four years or less, a dominant metabolic acidosis with low arterial pH (raised hydrogen ion concentration) is common. Acidosis may increase salicylate transfer across the blood brain barrier. Uncommon features include haematemesis, hyperpyrexia, hypoglycaemia, hypokalaemia, thrombocytopaenia, increased INR/PTR, intravascular coagulation, renal failure and non-cardiac pulmonary oedema.

Central nervous system features including confusion, disorientation, coma and convulsions are more common in children than adults.

Caffeine
Common features include CNS stimulation; anxiety, nervousness, restlessness, insomnia, excitement, muscle twitching, confusion, convulsions. Cardiac Symptoms include tachycardia, cardiac arrhythmia. Gastric symptoms include abdominal or stomach pains.
Other symptoms of overdosage, associated with the caffeine component, include diuresis and facial flushing.

Management

Aspirin
Give activated charcoal if an adult presents within one hour of ingestion of more than 250 mg/kg. The plasma salicylate concentration should be measured, although the severity of poisoning cannot be determined from this alone and the clinical and biochemical features must be taken into account. Elimination is increased by urinary alkalinisation, which is achieved by the administration of 1.26% sodium bicarbonate.

The urine pH should be monitored. Correct metabolic acidosis with intraveneous 8.4
% sodium bicarbonate (first check serum potassium). Forced diuresis should not be used since it does not enhance salicylate excretion and may cause pulmonary oedema.
Haemodialysis is the treatment of choice for severe poisoning and should be considered in patients with plasma salicylate concentrations > 700 mg/l (5.1 mmol/l), or lower concentrations associated with severe clinical or metabolic features. Patients under 10 years or over 70 years have increased risk of salicylate toxicity and may
require dialysis at an earlier stage.

Caffeine
Treatment of caffeine overdose is primarily symptomatic and supportive. Diuresis
should be treated by maintaining fluid and electrolyte balance and CNS symptoms
can be controlled by intravenous administration of diazepam.

5.1 Pharmacodynamic Properties

ATC code: N02BE51
Pharmacotherapeutic group: Other analgesics and antipyretics

Mechanisms of action/effect

Salicylates inhibit the activity of the enzyme cyclo-oxygenase to decrease the formation of precursors of prostaglandins and thromboxanes from arachidonic acid. Although many of the therapeutic effects may result from inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis (and consequent reduction of prostaglandin activity) in various tissues, other actions may also contribute significantly to the therapeutic effects.

Analgesic
Produces analgesia through a peripheral action by blocking pain impulse generation and via a central action, possibly in the hypothalamus.

Anti-inflammatory (Nonsteriodal)

Exact mechanisms have not been determined. Salicylates may act peripherally in inflamed tissue probably by inhibiting the synthesis of prostaglandins and possibly by inhibiting the synthesis and/or actions of other mediators of the inflammatory response.

Antipyretic

May produce antipyresis by acting centrally on the hypothalamic heat-regulating centre to produce peripheral vasodilation resulting in increased cutaneous blood flow, sweating and heat loss.



Caffeine

Mechanisms of action/effect

Central nervous system stimulant - caffeine stimulates all levels of the CNS, although its cortical effects are milder and of shorter duration than those of amphetamines.

Analgesia adjunct
Caffeine constricts cerebral vasculature with an accompanying decrease in the cerebral blood flow and in the oxygen tension of the brain. It is believed that caffeine helps to relieve headache by providing more rapid onset of action and/or enhancing pain relief with lower doses of analgesic. Recent studies with ergotamine indicate that the enhancement of effect by the addition of caffeine may also be due to improved gastrointestinal absorption of ergotamine when administered with caffeine.

5.2 Pharmacokinetic Properties

Caffeine is excreted in the urine. The major metabolites are 1-methylxanthine, 7-methylxanthine and 1,7- dimethylxanthine (paraxanthine). Minor metabolites include 1-methyluric acid, and 5-acetylamino-6 formylamino 3-methyluracil (AMFU).
In adults, marked individual variability in the rate of elimination occurs. The mean plasma elimination half life is 4.9 hours with a range of 1.9 - 12.2 hours. Caffeine distributes into all body fluids. The mean plasma protein binding of caffeine is 35%.


Updated on 15 June 2011 PIL

Reasons for updating

  • Change to, or new use for medicine
  • Change to warnings or special precautions for use
  • Change of contraindications
  • Change to instructions about overdose
  • Change to side-effects
  • Change to drug interactions
  • Change to date of revision

Updated on 10 August 2010 SmPC

Reasons for updating

  • Change to marketing authorisation holder

Legal category: Supply through general sale

Free text change information supplied by the pharmaceutical company

7.         MARKETING AUTHORISATION HOLDER

 

                                    Pfizer Consumer Healthcare Ltd

                        Ramsgate Road, Sandwich

                        Kent CT13 9NJ

                        United Kingdom
 
(Formally Wyeth Consumer Healthcare) 

Updated on 6 August 2010 PIL

Reasons for updating

  • Change to MA holder contact details

Updated on 9 June 2010 SmPC

Reasons for updating

  • Change to section 4.5 - Interaction with other medicinal products and other forms of interaction
  • Change to section 4.8 - Undesirable effects
  • Change to section 5.1 - Pharmacodynamic properties
  • Change to section 9 - Date of renewal of authorisation
  • Change to section 10 - Date of revision of the text
  • Change to product name
  • Change to section 4.4 - Special warnings and precautions for use

Legal category: Supply through general sale

Free text change information supplied by the pharmaceutical company

1. Renewal completed and the product name was changed in line with EU guidance.
2. Product information brought in line with EU warnings on disturbances in female fertility, cardiovascular and G.I. safety and serious skin reactions. Thrombotic risks.
3. Interactions of aspirin and ibuprofen.     

Updated on 9 June 2010 PIL

Reasons for updating

  • Change to date of revision

Updated on 12 December 2006 SmPC

Reasons for updating

  • Change to section 6.3 - Shelf life

Legal category: Supply through general sale

Free text change information supplied by the pharmaceutical company

Amend section 6.3
Shelf -life increased to 36 months

Updated on 31 March 2005 SmPC

Reasons for updating

  • Change to section 3 - Pharmaceutical form

Legal category: Supply through general sale

Updated on 17 December 2004 SmPC

Reasons for updating

  • Change to section 6.3 - Shelf life

Legal category: Supply through general sale

Updated on 3 November 2004 PIL

Reasons for updating

  • New PIL for medicines.ie

Updated on 24 June 2004 SmPC

Reasons for updating

  • Change to section 4.4 - Special warnings and precautions for use
  • Change to section 4.2 - Posology and method of administration

Legal category: Supply through general sale

Updated on 12 March 2004 SmPC

Reasons for updating

  • Change to section 2 - Qualitative and quantitative composition
  • Change to section 4.4 - Special warnings and precautions for use
  • Change to section 6.1 - List of excipients

Legal category: Supply through general sale

Updated on 19 June 2003 SmPC

Reasons for updating

  • New SPC for medicines.ie

Legal category: Supply through general sale